A blog for people who don't want to spend all their free time in the real world. After all, we live and work there. Escape the mundane with books, travel, and writing.

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Praise for Far-Knowing

Here are some snippets from a recent review of my novel, Far-Knowing

"Brasher’s language is elegant and unaffected, naturally evocative"

"The story, written from [the two main characters'] alternate points of view, uses their mutual prejudices, smouldering jealousy, and diametrically contrasting experiences of life to bring added spark and edge to what is already an exciting and fast-paced narrative. Brasher handles their different narrative voices with great skill, imbuing each with wry humour which really added to the book."

"Highly recommended. I hope there is more to come."

Read the whole review on Amazon.

To read the novel for yourself:  Far-Knowing, by Melinda Brasher

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

The Railway Children by E. Nesbit

Absolutely charming.  Nesbit's warm, talk-directly-to-the-reader style is beautiful in a calm sort of way, filling everything with wonder.  The characters are lovable (if perhaps unrealistically good and kind).  The adventures are delightful (if a bit too reliant on coincidence).  The atmosphere is easy to imagine, thanks to the clear and engaging writing.

I loved it.  Hightly recommended for anyone who wants a gentle, wholesome, life-affirming read.

And if you like this, try Nesbit's Book of Dragons.

FREE for Kindle on Amazon:  The Railway Children

Sunday, March 20, 2016

Easter Egg Tree

Happy Spring!

Here's my Easter egg tree, with Czech-style eggs.  The way they decorate them is amazing!


Some of these eggs I decorated myself (the less beautiful ones)
The amazing ones I bought from local vendors.


Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Geo Guesser Game


If you love to travel, or just like geography or the world in general, check out this awesome geography game.  You get a Google maps street view image and you have to guess where in the world it is.  Some views have lots of clues--architecture, the language on signs, the types of road signs, distinctive plants, etc.  Others are harder.  It's a real challenge.  But be warned:  you may spend too much time on it.

https://geoguessr.com/

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Great Quote about Music



The quote is possibly by Frank Ocean
The truth in it is absolutely brilliant

And it also applies to literature, film, visual art  

As a writer, try to tap into both your happiness and your sadness to create something that sings to people through their triumphs and despair.   

Thursday, March 3, 2016

The Best Books I Read in 2014

Okay, I know this is a little late, but I had so much fun with my list of Best Books I Read in 2015 that I just had to continue.  And this list has several independent (self) published books.  Yeah!  So...

The Best Books I Read in 2014


Book of Dragons by Edith Nesbit—Charming, charming, charming.  Made me feel like a kid again.

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness—Emotionally powerful and beautifully written.

Red Skies (Tales of the Scavenger's Daughters) by Kay Bratt—Takes place worlds away in China.  Culturally fascinating.


The Seventh Friend by Tim Stead—Great epic fantasy that still stays close to the characters.  Fantastic world-building.  Indi publishing at its best.

Cold Spell by Deb Vanasse—A literary story about the image and reality of Alaska

Kafka's House by Gabriela Popa—Life in Romania in the 60s—through the eyes of a child who doesn't really understand all the politics around her.  Indi published.

Life First by R.J. Crayton—a scary bit of YA utopia/dystopia fiction.  Indi published.

Beka Cooper; Terrier by Tamora Pierce—Unique voice and great characters (including perhaps the best cat in literature) make this a classic Tamora Pierce fantasy.

The Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson—Interesting world-building, like medieval Europe meets Central America.  Engaging plot.


Cannery Row by John Steinbeck—Hopeless yet still lovable characters.  And the scene with the frogs…heartbreaking.